Southern California Primate Research Forum:


Past Forums

This is a listing of past Forum schedules,
just in case anyone is historically inclined.

First (12 November 1994, Pitzer College)
Second (27 April 1995, USC)
Third (18 November 1995, San Diego Zoo)
Fourth (27 April 1996, CSU Fullerton) Primate conservation in the 21st century
Fifth (16 November 1996, CSU Long Beach)
Sixth (26 April 1997, L. A. Zoo) New developments for primates in captivity and in situ
Seventh (15 November 1997, USC) Primate conservation and genetics
Eighth (25 April 1998, UCSD) Primate brains, primate minds
Ninth (14 November 1998, UCLA) What are other primates telling us?
Tenth (18 April 1999, CSU Fullerton) Primate cultures -- says who?
Eleventh (13 November, 1999, UCLA) Feminism and behavioral biology
Twelfth (8 April, 2000, Pasadena City College Forty years at Gombe
Thirteenth (11 November, 2000, LA Zoo New World primates
Fourteenth (21 April, 2001, San Diego Zoo Baboons
Fifteenth (10 November 2001, CSU Fullerton)Gibbons
Sixteenth (27 April 2002, CSU Fullerton)Primate life histories
Seventeenth (16 November 2002, CSU San Bernardino)Human origins, adaptation and dispersal
Eighteenth (12 April 2003, Mira Costa College)Infanticide
Nineteenth (22 November 2003, CSU Long Beach) The Orangutan Crisis
Twentieth (24 April 2004, Pomona College) Primate Brain and Cognition
Twentyfirst (6 November, 2004, UC Riverside)From Binoculars to Microscope: Focusing on Primates in the Field and Captivity
Twentysecond (23 April, 2005, Pasadena City College))The Great Ape Crisis
Twentythird (12 November, 2005, UC San Diego))Primatology Beyond Primates
Twentyfourth (15 April, 2006, Cal. State University, Fullerton)Growing up: Development in primates
Twentyfifth (11 November, 2006, Cal. State University, Fullerton)Social learning of apes and monkeys
Twentysixth (7 April 2007, USC)Looking at Lemurs of Madagascar
Twentyseventh (10 November 2007, SDSU)Asian Primates in Perspective
Twentyeighth (19 April 2008, CSU Fullerton)Which is our inner ape? Bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas revisited
Twentyninth (8 November 2008, Los Angeles Zoo)Primate conservation
Thirtieth (25 April 2009, CSU San Bernardino) New Discoveries in Primate Behavior
Thirtyfirst (7 November 2009, CSU Northridge)New Directions in Studies of New World Monkeys
Thirtysecond (24 April 2010, CSU Fullerton)Mate choice in humans and nonhuman primates
Thirtythird (13 November 2010, SDSU)Primate disease transmission & conservation
Thirtyfourth (23 April 2011, SDSU)Tropical forest ecology: Implications for Primate Conservation
Thirtyfifth (5 November 2011, MiraCosta College)Primate Tool Use
Thirtysixth (28 April, 2012, CSU Fullerton)Primate Conservation in Today's World
Thirtyseventh (27 April, 2013, USC)Great Ape Fieldwork in the 21st Century
Thirtyeighth (6 December, 2014, CSUF)The Current State of Sanctuaries/Reintroduction Centers for Great Apes

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First Semiannual Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

12 November 1994
Pitzer College, Claremont

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

10:00 Gather for coffee at Scott Hall, then go on over to Avery Auditorium

10:15 Welcoming address: Norm Rosen, USC

10:30 Opening speaker: Dr. Donald Lindburg, Behaviorist, CRES, San Diego Zoo
Captive breeding of lion-tailed macaques: saving grace or moral atrocity?

11:30 Coffee break

11:45 Workshops:
*Censusing wild populations of primates: Norm Rosen, USC
*Networking primatologists with environmental enrichment: Rachel Rogers, San Diego Zoo
*Documenting the epiphanies of primatology: Dr. Anthony Rose, Social Change Systems

12:30 Lunch in the Founders Room, courtesy of Pitzer College

2:00 Research in progress: Dr. Lori K. Sheeran, CSU Fullerton
Endangerment of gibbons in China

2:30 Research in progress: Dr. Lynne E. Miller, Pitzer College
Foraging strategies of capuchin monkeys, Cebus olivaceus

3:00 Coffee break

3:15 Closing speaker: Dr. Lois K. Lippold, Prof. of Anthropology, SDSU
Distribution, status and conservation of douc langurs in Vietnam

4:30 Please join us for an informal gathering at nearby Don Salsa's Restaraunt!

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Lynne E. Miller, Dept. of Anthropology, Pitzer College
Rachel W. Rogers, San Diego Zoo
Anthony L. Rose, Social Change Systems, Hermosa Beach
Norm Rosen, AnthDept, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, AnthDept, CSU Fullerton

Second Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

27 April 1995
Anthropology Department, USC

AGENDA

2:00pm: Welcoming Address: Norm Rosen, Anthropology Dept., USC

2:15 Craig Stanford, Anthropology Dept., USC.
Chimpanzee hunting ecology and early hominid evolution

3:00 Joe Manson, AnthDept, UCLA.
Female mate choice and macaque social organization

3:45 Coffee Break

4:00 Lynne Fairbanks, Psychiatry Dept., UCLA.
Maternal investment in vervet monkeys: a lifespan approach

4:45 Featured Guest: Richard Wrangham, AnthDept, Harvard
Phylogeny and ecology in the evolution of the hominoids

5:45 Ethics Panel. Chaired by Anthony Rose, Social Change Systems
Ethics in field, laboratory and zoo settings. Topics and dilemmas

6:45 Buffet Dinner

8:00 Adjourn Forum

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Rachel W. Rogers, San Diego Zoo
Anthony L. Rose, Social Change Systems, Hermosa Beach
Norm Rosen, AnthDept, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, AnthDept, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, AnthDept, USC
Marcus Young Owl, AnthDept, CSU Long Beach

Directions: Take Exhibition Blvd. Offramp from Harbor Fwy and turn north on Exhibition to Figueroa Blvd. Turn East on Figueroa and park in lot on Figueroa next to Sizzler Restaurant. Cross Figueroa and walk through Gate 3 and USC Parking Lot, directly to Social Science Building, AnthDept, Lecture Room B127

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Third Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

18 November 1995
Otto Center, San Diego Zoo

AGENDA

8:30 Registration / Zoo site tour sign up -- first come, first choice

9:00 Refreshments and Welcoming: Norm Rosen and Karen Kilmar

9:20 Dr. Susan Perry, AnthDept, UCLA
Male-female relationships in wild white-faced capuchin monkeys

10:10 JoAnne Simerson, Behavior and Training Dept, San Diego Zoo
The use of operant conditioning for drill baboon management

11:00 Dr. Joan Silk, AnthDept, UCLA
Reconciliation in chacma baboons

11:50 Description of Lunch Break Activities

12:00 to 3:00 Zoo Visit and Lunch (on your own)
Specific site visits will be available -- details at registration table. Space is limited for some sites. Lunch at convenient Zoo restaurants.

3:00 Round Table Discussion. Discussants: Karen Kilmar, Don Lindburg, Katie Milton, Joan Silk, Tony Rose
Making captive-field connections

4:00 Snack Break

4:20 Dr. Mark Edwards, Nutritionist for Zoological Society of San Diego
Application of field and captive feeding studies for nutrition management of primates in captive settings

5:10 Featured Guest: Dr. Katherine Milton, AnthDept, UC Berkeley
Diets of nonhuman primates in relation to human food habits

6:00 Closing Remarks and Invitation to See the Zoo at Night, Rosen and Rogers

6:10 Adjourn Forum -- Begin "Nightlife at San Diego Zoo"
Informal (no host) dinner at Peacock and Raven Deli (wine and beer available). Afterdark Zoo Tour - visit galagos, douroucouli, and other nocturnal primates.

8:15 Head for home, hotel, or more nightlife!

DIRECTIONS: Take 405 Freeway south to 5 Fwy south, take zoo/museum exit at Pershing Drive. Follow Balboa Park signs to San Diego Zoo. Use Zoo parking lot. Take sidewalk to left of Zoo entrance until you reach the Otto Center.

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Karen Kilmar, San Diego Zoo
Rachel Rogers, San Diego Zoo
Anthony Rose, Biosynergy Institute, Hermosa Beach
Norm Rosen, AnthDept, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, AnthDept, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, AnthDept, USC
Marcus Young Owl, AnthDept, CSU Long Beach

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Fourth Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

27 April 1996
California State University, Fullerton
University Center, Titan Theater

PRIMATE CONSERVATION IN THE 21ST CENTURY

AGENDA

8:45 Lori Sheeran (CSUF), Norm Rosen (USC)
Welcome to the 4th Southern California Primate Research Forum

9:00 Michael Gilpin (UC San Diego, Conservation Biology)
Visions of conservation in the 21st century

10:00 Oliver Ryder (San Diego Zoological Society, C. R. E. S.)
Conservation genetics -- foundations for survival

11:00 Kelly Stewart (AnthDept, UC Davis)
Ground-level conservation -- the state of the gorilla nation

12:00 Lunch break and visit to the new CSUF Primate Museum

1:30 Shirley Strum (AnthDept, UC San Diego)
Major challenges to non-human primate conservation

2:30 Panel Discussion: Meeting the challenges Moderator: Anthony Rose.
Discussants: Ardith Eudey, Jim Moore, Norm Rosen, Craig Stanford.
Commentators: M. Gilpin, O. Ryder, K. Stewart, S. Strum

3:30 Forum Subgroup Discussions -- Meeting the Challenges
Group 1 -- Conservation Priorities (facilitators: Eudey and Gilpin)
Group 2 -- Technology and Science (facilitators: Moore and Ryder)
Group 3 -- Ethics and Welfare (facilitators: Rose and Stewart)
Group 4 -- Cultural Conflict (facilitators: Stanford and Strum)

4:30 Forum Subgroup Reports / Large Group Discussion
15 minutes -- brief subgroup reports
30 minutes -- large group discussion

5:15 Forum wrap-up by Michael Gilpin and Shirley Strum

5:30 Adjourn to informal cocktail/dinner hour

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Jim Moore, AnthDept, UC San Diego
Anthony Rose, Biosynergy Institute, Hermosa Beach
Norm Rosen, AnthDept, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, AnthDept, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, AnthDept, USC
Marcus Young Owl, AnthDept, CSU Long Beach

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Fifth Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

16 November 1996
California State University, Long Beach

AGENDA

9:00am -- Coffee, Pastries & Sign-in

9:30am -- Marcus Young Owl (CSULB), Norm Rosen (SCPRF)
Welcome to the 5th Southern California Primate Research Forum

9:45am -- Jim Moore (UC San Diego, Anthropology)
Savanna chimpanzees and hominid ancestors.

10:45am -- Chris Boehm (USC, Anthropology)
Altruism in Humans and Other Primates

1200n -- Lunch break

1:00pm -- Christine Johnson (UC San Diego, Cognitive Sciences)
Bonobo Eye Gazing

2:00pm -- Sandy Harcourt (UC Davis, Anthropology)
Gorilla Social Structure.

2:30pm -- Workshops and Conservation Updates
* The PHVA process for Great Apes -- Norm Rosen (USC)
* Viet Nam's Illegal Primate Trade -- Lois Lippold (CSUSD)
* Development of Sanctuaries for Thai Gibbons -- Lori Sheeran (CSUF)
* The African Great Ape Bushmeat Crisis -- Tony Rose (BSI)

4:30pm -- General Discussion -- Recommendations for future Forums

5:00pm -- Adjourn ---------------------------------------------------------

[Additional details seem to be lost in the mists of time...]
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Sixth Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

26 April 1997
Los Angeles Zoo
GLAZA Grand Room

NEW DEVELOPMENTS FOR PRIMATES IN CAPTIVITY AND IN SITU

AGENDA

8:30 Coffee, rolls, and greetings!

9:00 Welcome: About the Forum (past, present and future) -- Tony Rose, SCPRF

9:10 Manuel Mollinedo, Director, Los Angeles Zoo
Development of the Great Ape Forest at L. A. Zoo

9:25 Phil Morin (Sequana Therapeutics)
Development and applications of human genomic markers for use in non-human primates

10:25 Coffee break

10:35 Alan Mootnick (ICGS)
Behavior and captive management of the gibbons housed at the International Center for Gibbon Studies

11:35 Zoo Staff
Chimpanzees of the Mahale Mountains: the first of 3 new great ape facilities to be built at the L. A. Zoo
* Vicki Bingamin, Primate Keeper: Facility design
* Cindy Wallace, Curator of Education: Facility graphics
* Cathleen Cox, Director of Research: Facility Assessment

12:20 Lunch and docent guided tours
including visits to the chimp facility, African primates, Asian primates, and New World primates

2:15 Janette Wallis (U. Oklahoma)
Primate conservation from A (academia) to Z (zoos): defining roles and setting goals

3:15 Short reports
Rosen on Uganda PVA, Sheeran on Thai sanctuaries, Stanford on Bwindi study, Muller on testosterone, Rose on bushmeat ... other reports to be announced

4:30 Adjourn (could be up to 5:00pm if reports and discussions expand)

Admission to cover costs for this Forum is: $7 students / $12 non- students

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Lois Lippold, CSU San Diego
Jim Moore, UC San Diego
Anthony Rose, Biosynergy Institute
Norm Rosen, USC
Lori Sheeran, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, USC
Marcus Young Owl, CSU Long Beach

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Seventh Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

15 November 1997
University of Southern California
Anthropology Department / Room 27

PRIMATE CONSERVATION AND GENETICS

AGENDA

8:30 Coffee, rolls and greetings!

9:00 Welcome: Norm Rosen and Craig Stanford, University of Southern California

9:15 Anthony Goldberg, University of Illinois
Genetics and bio- geography of East African chimpanzees

10:15 Coffee break

10:30 David Woodruff, Biology Dept., University of California, San Diego
Primate conservation and genetics

11:30 Pascal Gagneux, Biology Dept., University of California, San Diego
Population genetics of West African chimpanzees

12:30 Lunch Break (see below for specifics)

2:00 Ardith Eudey, IUCN/SSC Asian Primate Group Chairperson
Asia -- conservation update

2:30 Speakers Panel and Forum: Anthony Rose, SCPRF Moderator
Hot topics in primate conservation and genetics

4:30 Adjourn (could be up to 5:00pm if Forum is really hot!)

Admission to cover costs for this Forum is: $7 students / $12 non- students

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Lois Lippold, CSU San Diego
Jim Moore, UC San Diego
Anthony Rose, Biosynergy Institute
Norm Rosen, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, USC
Marcus Young Owl, CSU Long Beach

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Eighth Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

25 April 1998
University of California, San Diego
Solis Hall room 104

PRIMATE BRAINS, PRIMATE MINDS

AGENDA

8:30 Coffee, rolls and greetings!

9:00 Welcome: About the Forum (past, present and future) -- Norm Rosen, SCPRF

9:10 Katerina Semendeferi (UCSD)
Ape brains - human brains: dissecting cognitive systems and adaptations

10:10 Coffee break

10:35 Shirley Strum (UCSD)
How should we think about cognition in monkeys: baboon troop movements and other issues

11:35 Susan Perry (UCLA)
Social cognition in capuchins: insights from coalitionary aggression

12:35 Lunch.
During the lunch period, there will be a Poster Session in the BioAnthro Lab illustrating UCSD student research projects from a recent class taught by Lynne Miller

2:15 Nancy Caine (CSUSM)
Bugs, beasts, and black-and-white: considering the callitrichid lifestyle

3:15 Short reports
Norm Rosen on mountain gorilla CMP, Moore on Kyoto symposium, Phil Robinson on Liberia, Karen Kilmar on Vietnam, Michelle Molina on orangutans, Ardith Eudey on Wisconsin stumptails

4:30 Adjourn (could be up to 5:00 if reports and discussions expand)

Admission to cover costs for this Forum is: $7 students / $12 non- students

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Lois Lippold, CSU San Diego
Jim Moore, UC San Diego
Anthony Rose, Biosynergy Institute
Norm Rosen, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, USC
Marcus Young Owl, CSU Long Beach

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Ninth Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

14 November 1998
University of California, Los Angeles
Haines Hall / Room 2

WHAT ARE OTHER PRIMATES TELLING US?

AGENDA

8:30 Check-in, coffee, doughnuts and greetings

9:00 Welcome to the Forum -- Norm Rosen, SCPRF, and Joe Manson, UCLA

9:15 Matt Jorgensen (UCLA)
Joysticks and primates: a cognitive retrospective

10:15 Coffee break

10:30 Joan Silk (UCLA)
Reconciliation in baboons: grunts, apologies and good intentions

11:30 Craig Stanford (USC)
Are chimpanzees from Mars and bonobos from Venus?

12:30 Lunch

1:45 Cheryl Knott (Harvard)
Reproductive ecology of orangutans in Borneo

2:45 Short Reports
Gerald on vervet aggression, Stanford on Bwindi gorillas, Rose on Bushmeat Campaign, Moore on chimp websites, Rosen on PHVA action, and others

3:45 Forum Panel Discussion: Tony Rose (SCPRF), moderator
Thinking, hunting, fighting, making love and making up -- What are other primates telling us about humankind?

4:45 Adjourn (could be up to 5:00 if Forum is really hot!)

Admission to cover costs for this Forum is: $7 students / $12 non- students

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Lauren Arenson, Pasadena CC
Joe Manson, UCLA
Jim Moore, UC San Diego
Susan Perry, UCLA
Anthony Rose, Antioch University
Norm Rosen, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, USC

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Tenth Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

18 April 1999
California State University, Fullerton
University Center, Titan Theater

PRIMATE CULTURES -- SAYS WHO?

AGENDA

9:00 Check-in, coffee, doughnuts and greetings

9:25 Welcome to the Forum -- Norm Rosen (SCPRF)

9:30 Mary Baker, Ph.D. (UC Riverside)
Monkey mores: don't rub capuchins the wrong way

10:20 Coffee break

10:40 Linda Marchant, Ph.D. (Miami of Ohio)
The chimpanzees of Mahale

11:30 News reports:
Advances and setbacks in primate conservation (Forum organizers)

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Dorothy Fragaszy, Ph.D. (U. Georgia)
Only humans have cultures

2:00 William McGrew, Ph.D. (Miami of Ohio)
All chimps have cultures

3:00 Forum Panel discussion:
Culture - says who? The McGrew- Fragaszy debate
Moderator: Jim Moore, SCPRF

4:00 Adjourn

Admission to cover costs for this Forum is: $7 students / $12 non- students

SCRPF Organizing Committee:

Lauren Arenson, Pasadena CC
Jim Moore, UC San Diego
Anthony Rose, Antioch University
Norm Rosen, USC
Lori K. Sheeran, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, USC

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Eleventh Meeting of the Southern California Primate Research Forum

13 November 1999
UCLA
Math/Science Building, Room 4000

Co-Sponsored by CSEOL
(Center for the Study of Evolution and the Origin of Life)

FEMINISM AND BEHAVIORAL BIOLOGY

9:00 welcome (Norm Rosen, USC)

9:30 Amy Parish (USC and University College, London)
The politics of female dominance in bonobos (abstract)

10:45 Patty Gowaty (U of GA)
The theory of inter-sexual conflict, components of fitness, and institutionalized monogamous marriages

11:45 Lunch (on your own)

1:30 Sarah Blaffer Hrdy (UC Davis)
The optimal number of fathers: Evolution, demography and history in the shaping of female mate preferences (abstract)

2:30 Panel (Facilitator: Mary Batten, science writer)
Darwinian feminism

3:15 Coffee break

3:30 Short reports
* Update on the bushmeat crisis, and African sanctuary workshop/Bonobos (Norm Rosen)

4:30 concluding remarks (Norm Rosen)

Admission: $7 students / $12 all others

Map and directions

SCPRF Organizing Committee:

Lauren Arenson (Pasadena City College)
John Bragin (CSEOL)
Jim Moore (UCSD)
Amy Parish (USC & University College, Londond)
Tony Rose (Antioch University)
Norm Rosen (USC)
Lori Sheeran (CSUF)
Craig Stanford (USC)

Further reading:
Batten, M. (1994)
Sexual Strategies: How Females Choose Their Mates (Tarcher/Putnam)
Gowaty, P. A. (1997)
Feminism and evolutionary biology : boundaries, intersections, and frontiers New York: Chapman & Hall
Hrdy, S. B. (1981)
The Woman That Never Evolved Cambridge: Harvard Univ. Press (new edition due November 1999)
Hrdy, S. B. (1999)
Mother Nature : A History of Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection New York: Pantheon.
Schiebinger, L. L. (1999)
Has feminism changed science? Cambridge: Harvard University Press.


Amy Parish (USC and University College, London)
The politics of female dominance in bonobos. Chimpanzee societies are typically characterized as physically aggressive, male-bonded and male-dominated. Their close relatives, bonobos differ in startling and significant ways. For instance, female bonobos bond with one another, form coalitions and dominate males. A pattern of reluctance to consider, let alone acknowledge, female dominance in bonobos exists, however. As both species are equally "man's" closest relative, the bonobo social system complicates models of human evolution that have historically been based upon referents that are male and chimpanzee-like. The bonobo evidence suggests that models of human evolution must be reformulated such that they also accommodate: real and meaningful female bonds; the possibility of systematic female dominance over males; female mating strategies which encompass extra-group paternities; hunting and meat distribution by females; the importance of sharing of plant foods; affinitive inter-community interactions; males which don't stalk and attack and aren't territorial; and flexible social relationships in which philopatry does not necessarily predict bonding pattern.
back to program of 11th Forum

Sarah Blaffer Hrdy (Anthropology Dept, UC Davis):
The optimal number of fathers: Evolution, demography and history in the shaping of female mate preferences. Around the world polygynous marriage (one man several women) is vastly more common than polyandrous marriage (one woman several men), and women tend to be more cautious about entering into sexual relationship than men are. Such patterns are often assumed to reflect essential differences between the sexes. However the same dichotomy between "ardent" males and "coy" females is not found in other primates. Furthermore, under a range of circumstances females enhance their reproductive success by mating with multiple partners and use polyandrous mating (soliciting copulations from several or more males) to circumvent male-imposed costs on their free choice of mates. The existence of one-male mating systems does not prove that females "naturally" gravitate to them. Typically monandrous (copulating with just one partner) mating systems are maintained by one male excluding rivals or by other circumstances that distort female options. As with many other animals, primate females (including women) can benefit reproductively from polyandrous matings. Understanding this takes us beyond narrow research programs intent on demonstrating "universal" differences between the sexes, and allows us to study females as flexible and opportunistic individuals who confront recurring reproductive dilemmas and tradeoffs within a world of shifting options. back to program of 11th Forum

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Forty Years at Gombe:
Research and Retrospective

Pasadena City College

Saturday 8 April, 2000
Building C - Room 333


Schedule
8:30 am Check-in, coffee, doughnuts and greetings

9:00 Welcome to the Forum
(Norm Rosen, SCPRF & Lauren Arenson, PCC)

9:15 Martin Muller (USC/Harvard):
The Reproductive Ecology of Male Chimpanzees: Testosterone, Dominance and Aggression

10:15 Coffee break

10:30 Anne Pusey (U. Minnesota):
New insights into chimpanzee social structure at Gombe

11:30 Craig Stanford (USC):
Significant others: Chimpanzees and the reconstruction of early hominid behavioral ecology

12:30 Lunch *

1:45 Richard Wrangham (Harvard):
From Gombe to Kibale and beyond: problems in chimpanzee behavioral variation

2:45 Panel discussion:
Gombe's impact on the history and future of primatology

4:00 Adjourn

Admission to cover costs: $7 students / $12 all others

RSVP by April 1st so that we can plan for refreshments

Norm Rosen email:

normrosen@aol.com

* The campus eatery is closed Saturday; catered lunch will be available for about $8.
When you RSVP, be sure to indicate whether you plan to purchase lunch,
and if you prefer meat or vegetarian
.

Area and campus maps:
http://www.paccd.cc.ca.us/instadmn/compsvcs/spring/map.htm

SCPRF Organizing Committee:

Lauren Arenson, Pasadena City College
Jim Moore, UC San Diego
Anthony Rose, Antioch University
Norm Rosen, USC
Lori Sheeran, CSU Fullerton
Craig Stanford, USC

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New World Primates

Los Angeles Zoo

Saturday 11 November, 2000


Schedule
8:30 am Check-in, coffee, doughnuts and greetings

8:45 Welcome to the Forum -- Norm Rosen (SCPRF) and LA Zoo Administration/Staff

9:05 Lynne Miller (MiraCosta College)
Eat or Be Eaten: Predator risk and foraging strategies in Venezuelan capuchin monkeys (Cebus olivaceus) abstract

10:05 Break

10:20 Sue Perry (UCLA)
Traditions in Wild White-Faced Capuchins abstractReflects 10/19 change by authors

11:30 Cathleen Cox (LA ZOO)
New World Primate Taxon/AZA update

11:45 Lunch/tours (box lunch available for $8.00; see below)

1:15 Karen Strier (U. Wisconsin, Madison)
Muriquis at the Millennium: Sex, sex ratios, and survival strategies abstract

2:15 Sue Boinski (U. Florida, Gainesville)
Effects of geographic variation in predation risk and food competition on the behavior of three species of squirrel monkeys readings

3:15 Break

3:30 Chris Duvall (San Jose State University)
Important Habitat for Chimpanzees in Mali

4:00 Norm Rosen-Chairman PASA
Pan African Sanctuaries form an Alliance

4:25 Raffaella Commitante(CSUF-LA Zoo)
The Golden Lion Tamarin Conservation program
Reflects 10/18 change: John Bosco Nkurunungi had to cancel

4:45 Concluding remarks

5:00 Adjourn

Admission to cover costs: $7 students / $12 all others

Please RSVP by Nov.1st, so we can plan doughnuts and box lunches!!
RSVP to: Norm Rosen normrosen@aol.com;
indicate vegetarian or nonveg lunch.

To be added to the SCPRF mailing list, contact Jim Moore at jjmoore@ucsd.edu; please specify email or hardcopy list. Notices generally show up here on the website before being [e]mailed.

For more on the LA Zoo, see http://www.lazoo.org/ and for directions, http://www.lazoo.org/zoofacts-dir.html. Click here for a map. Parking is free.

SCPRF Organizing Committee:
Lauren Arenson, Pasadena City College / Jim Moore, UC San Diego / Anthony Rose, Antioch University / Norm Rosen, USC / Lori Sheeran, CSU Fullerton / Craig Stanford, USC


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Baboons

San Diego Zoo

Saturday 21 April, 2001


8:30 am Check-in, coffee, doughnuts and greetings

9:00 am Welcome (Norm Rosen, SCPRF & Helena Fitch-Snyder, CRES/San Diego Zoo)

9:15 am Alan Dixson (CRES/San Diego Zoo)
Sexual behavior & mating system of semi-freeranging mandrills in Gabon

10:05 am Break

10:20 am Joan Silk (UCLA)
The adaptive value of social bonds

11:10 am Willie Smits (Wanariset Rehabilitation Center/Borneo)
Ten years overview of working with orangutans at Wanariset

12:00 am Lunch
(on your own; there are many places to eat on the Zoo grounds; admission included with registration)

1:30 pm Sara Johnson (University of New Mexico & CSUF)
Life history and the social environment among chacma baboons in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

2:20 pm Shirley Strum (UCSD)
Prospects for translocation as a primate conservation and management tool: insights from the Pumphouse Gang (abstract)

3:10 pm Break

3:30 pm Fred Bercovitch (CRES/San Diego Zoo)
Evolution of Sexual Skin Swellings in Baboons(abstract)

4:20 pm Tony Rose (SCPRF)
Bushmeat crisis update

4:40 pm Adjourn

Admission to cover costs: $7 students / $12 all others

RSVP to Norm Rosen normrosen@aol.com by 11 April so that we can plan Zoo admissions and refreshments!

Venue: Otto Center, San Diego Zoo. Directions to Zoo: http://www.sandiegozoo.org/zoo/visitor_info.html
Park in the main Zoo parking lot. Instead of entering at the main gates, go to the left (south), crossing a driveway and then proceeding down a tree-lined walkway. The Otto Center is at the end of the walkway.

SCPRF Organizing Committee: Lauren Arenson, Pasadena City College / Jim Moore, UC San Diego / Anthony Rose, Antioch University / Norm Rosen, USC / Lori Sheeran, CSU Fullerton / Craig Stanford, USC

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Contemporary views of gibbon behavior and ecology

California State University, Fullerton

Saturday 10 November, 2001


8:30 am Check-in, coffee, doughnuts and greetings

9:00 am Welcome (Norm Rosen, CSU Fullerton)

9:15 am Warren Brockelman (Center for Conservation Biology - Thailand)
Relation between social structure and ecology in gibbons Abstract

10:15 am Break

10:30 am Alan Mootnick (International Center for Gibbon Studies)
Captive management and conservation of gibbons in South and Southeast Asian zoos and rescue centers

11:30 am Lunch (on your own)

1:30 pm Christina Klein and Lori Sheeran (CSUF)
Differential mortality in captive gibbons and siamangs Abstract

2:30 pm Ardith Eudey (IUCN Primate Specialist Group - Asia)
Recent Primate Specialist Group activity involving the taxonomy and conservation of gibbons Abstract

3:00 pm Break

3:15 pm Agustin Fuentes (Central Washington University)
Real Swinging Apes? What gibbon pairbonds and grouping patterns can tell us about evolution and conservation Abstract

4:00 pm Juanita Kempe and Dillu Ashby (LA Zoo)
Gibbon Conservation

4:20 pm Short reports

5:00 pm Adjourn


Admission to cover costs: $7 students / $12 all others
CSUF students are free

RSVP to Erin Musick dmusick@lycos.com by 31 October so that we can plan refreshments!

Conference T-shirts will be available for approximately $10

Venue: Room 121 McCarthy Hall, CSUF

Map: http://www.fullerton.edu/paweb/csfmap.html

Park in Lot D (parking is free)

SCPRF Organizing Committee: Sara Johnson, CSU Fullerton / Jim Moore, UC San Diego / Anthony Rose, Antioch University / Norm Rosen, CSU Fullerton / Lori Sheeran, CSU Fullerton / Craig Stanford, USC

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Production and reproduction: The evolution of primate and human life histories

California State University, Fullerton

Saturday 10 November, 2001


Jointly sponsored by SCPRF, the CSUF Anthropology Students Association, and CSUF Associated Students.

The conference will take place at the Fullerton Marriott at California State University, 2701 East Nutwood Avenue, Fullerton, CA 92831. There is parking at the hotel, which is on campus, but all campus lots are free and open without permit on Saturday so there is plenty of parking on campus which is directly west of the hotel. Further directions and map available at http://anthro.fullerton.edu/symposium/

PROGRAM:

8:30 - 9:00
Welcome and introduction

9:00-12:15
Morning session

Sara Johnson and John Bock (Cal State Fullerton) Life History and the Social Environment

Craig Stanford (University of Southern California) Meat-eating and the Human-Ape Divergence

William McGrew and Linda Marchant (Miami Ohio) The Problem of Nonhuman Culture

12:15-1:15
Lunch

1:15-3:15
Afternoon Session

Hillard Kaplan (University of New Mexico) The Embodied Capital Theory of Life History Evolution

Kristen Hawkes (University of Utah) The Grandmother Hypothesis and Human Life History Evolution

3:30-5:00
Panel discussion Sarah Blaffer Hrdy (UC Davis), moderator

5:30 - 6:30
Reception at the Cal State Fullerton Anthropology Teaching and Research Facility, McCarthy Hall 426 Directions available at the conference

FREE to students with ID; $12 to others.

Watch this space and http://anthro.fullerton.edu/symposium/ for updates and details.

SCPRF Organizing Committee: John Bock, CSUF / Jim Moore, UCSD / Anthony Rose, Antioch University / Norm Rosen, CSUF / Lori Sheeran, CSUF/ Craig Stanford, USC / Nikki Kanbara-CSUF(ASA)

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November 16, 2002
8:30 to 5:30 pm
California State University, San Bernardino
Room SB-128


Human origins, adaptation and dispersal

Schedule [click name for webpage]:

8:30 am
Registration and introductions

9:00 - 11:45
Morning session

Carol Ward (U. Missouri) Evolutionary context for hominin emergence abstract

Kevin Hunt (Indiana U.) Parallels in australopithecine and chimpanzee habitats: Implications for early hominin foraging strategies

Mary Baker (Whittier C) Introduction to poster presentations of student research on captive primates

11:45 - 1:15
Lunch and viewing of posters now available online

1:15 - 4:30
Afternoon session

Alan Walker (Penn State U.) The first hominid dispersal from Africa abstract

Wesley A Niewoehner (CSU SB)Late Pleistocene human behavioral evolution: Evidence from the fossil record abstract

Ian Tattersall (Amer. Mus. Natural History, NY Adaptation: An evolutionary red herring? abstract

4:30 - 5:15
Panel discussion

5:30 - 6:30
Reception in Anthropology Museum, Third Floor


Admission: Free to CSUSB students
$12 all others (includes coffee, pastries, etc.)

A hot buffet lunch (with vegetarian option) will be available for $12.50. Please email proberts@csusb.edu by November 9 to reserve a lunch. Payment taken at registration. Please note that there are very limited lunch options within 1 or 2 miles of campus.

Maps to and of the campus at http://www.csusb.edu/campus/maps.html(the SB building is shown as "under construction", but is now open).

Parking on campus is $1.50

CSU SB website on the symposium

SCPRF Organizing Committee: Peter Robertshaw, CSUSB / Wes Niewoehner, CSUSB / Mary Baker, Whittier College / Jim Moore, UCSD / Anthony Rose, Antioch University / Norm Rosen, CSUF / Lori Sheeran, CSUF/ Craig Stanford, USC


The evening of Friday, 15 November, Ian Tattersall will give a free public lecture on

Becoming Human

at the Events Center, CSU SB


April 12, 2003

Mira Costa College (Oceanside Campus)
Theater (Building 2000)

April 12, 2003

INFANTICIDE

SCHEDULE
8:15 am
Registration begins

9:00
Welcome (Norm Rosen, SCPRF; Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College)

9:30
Volker Sommer
Holy but selfish: The classic case of infanticide in Indian temple monkeys (short background article)

10:30
Break

11:00
Charles Nunn
Seduction, resistance and antagonistic coevolution: A comparative perspective on infanticide in primates

12:00
Lunch and poster session [SEE BELOW]

1:30
Ryne Palombit
Variation in male infanticide in savanna baboons

2:30
Break

3:00
Sarah B. Hrdy
What are the implications for humans? A brief overview
Followed by panel discussion with Sarah Hrdy (moderator) and other speakers.


Directions and Map

REGISTRATION: $12 for faculty, $7 for students, and free of charge for MiraCosta students.

LUNCH:
Was great!

PARKING:
Parking is free; for the theater, park in Lot 1A or 1B.

APOLOGY:
On the email version of the Forum flier, the titles of the talks by Ryne Palombit and Charlie Nunn were reversed. Ooops... They are correctly placed here.


Call for posters

The poster session is an excellent venue for Undergraduate and Master's level students to present their research and gain experience in a friendly and low pressure context. The poster session will convene during the lunch time period which has been extended to 1 1/2 hours. Attendees will be encouraged to have lunch on site so they will have time to view the posters.

This poster session was initiated at the last meeting and was a great success and we would like very much to see it continue. If you are a student, or know of a student, who is ready to present, please submit names and proposed titles to


Mary Bakeror
Lynn Miller
[emails deleted from archive copy]

Space will be limited, the earlier you respond the more likely we can include the poster.

Posters should be mounted on folding poster boards measuring 36" X 48" (when folded they measure 36" X 24") which can be purchased at most office supplies stores. General guidelines for how to put a poster together can be found at www.asp.org/education/howto_onPosters.html or at http://web.whittier.edu/academic/anthropology/mbaker/poster.html


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November 22, 2003

The Orangutan Crisis

Cal State University, Long Beach
Room CBA 140A, parking lot #17

22 November 2003

In addition to the SCPRF and CSU Long Beach, this Forum is being sponsored by
Balikpapan Orangutan Society - USA [BOS-USA].

SCHEDULE

8:30am
Check in-coffee/doughnuts/greetings
9:00am
Greetings-Norm Rosen

9:10am
Amory B. Lovins (CEO, Rocky Mountain Institute)
Borneo is born again

9:25am
Willie Smits (BOS-Indonesia)
Current status of Rehabilitation in Borneo

10:05
Coffee break

10:30am
Anne Russon (York University)
A palm's eye view of orangutan minds

11:20
Scott Stanley (Nature Conservancy [Borneo])
Discovery of a large new population of wild orangutans in Borneo

12:00
Poster session/Lunch

1:30pm
Carel van Schaik (Duke University)
Geographic variation in orangutan behavior: implications for conservation

2:20pm
Mark Leighton (Harvard University)
Raising Returns on Conservation Investments
3:30
Adjourn

CSULB campus directions and maps

LUNCH: There are several places for lunch near the Forum. The University will pass out food maps at the forum for all attendees.

REGISTRATION: $12 for general attendees, $7 with student ID (free of charge for CSULB students); pay at the door. Parking on campus is free.

Please RSVP to Norm Rosen for headcount purposes.

SCPRF Organizing committee: Marcus Young Owl, CSU Long Beach / Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College / Mary Baker, UC Riverside / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, CSUF / Craig Stanford, USC


Call for posters

There will be a poster session at the November Forum. Please contact Mary Baker and/or Lynne Miller for details on submission.

The poster session is an excellent venue for presentation of research in a friendly and low pressure context. The poster session will convene during the lunch time period, and attendees will be encouraged to have lunch on site so they will have time to view the posters.

Poster sessions were initiated in 2002 and have been a great success; we would like very much to see them continue. Submissions are encouraged from students, zoo keepers, researchers, and faculty; if space becomes an issue, preference will be given to students. If you would like to present a poster, please contact


Mary Baker at or
Lynne Miller
[emails dropped from archive copy]

Space will be limited, the earlier you respond the more likely we can include the poster.

Posters should be mounted on folding poster boards measuring 36" X 48" (when folded they measure 36" X 24") which can be purchased at most office supplies stores. General guidelines for how to put a poster together can be found at www.asp.org/education/howto_onPosters.html or at http://web.whittier.edu/academic/anthropology/mbaker/poster.html


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April 24, 2004

Primate Brain and Cognition

24 April 2004 at Pomona College
Smith Campus Center
Maps and directions
See also bottom of this page.


8:15 am Registration and coffee

9:00 am Welcome

9:30 am Robert Shumaker (Iowa Primate Learning Sanctuary)
Quantity Judgment by Orangutans

10:30 am Break

11:00 am Steve Leigh (University of Illinois, Urbana)
Brain Growth, Life History, and Cognition in Primate and Human Evolution
(selected papers available online at https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/sleigh/www/)

12:00 am Lunch
(on your own; there two campus eateries in the building and various restaurants within 4-6 blocks; maps will be available)

1:15 pm Katerina Semendeferi (UCSD)
Neural correlates of social cognition

2:15 pm Poster session and coffee break; see below for information on submitting a poster

3:15 pm
Paul Garber (University of Illinois, Urbana)
Primate Cognitive Ecology: New Approaches Using Experimental Field Studies

4:15 pm Wrap-up and adjournment

PARKING -- Park in any of the campus lots; campus security will not cite cars without a permit on the day of the conference.

REGISTRATION: $12 for general attendees, $7 with student ID (free of charge for Pomona students); pay at the door.

Please RSVP to Norm Rosen for headcount purposes.

SCPRF Organizing committee: Mark Jenike, Pomona / Christina Campbell, Pomona / Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College / Mary Baker, UC Riverside / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, CSUF / Craig Stanford, USC / Lauren Arenson, Pasadena City College


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November 6, 2004

From Binoculars to Microscope:
Focusing on Primates in the Field and Captivity

UC Riverside
6 November 2004
University Lecture Hall
9:00am - 4:30pm

CAMPUS MAP
The University Lecture Hall is building #76 on the map, adjacent to North Campus Drive and Parking lot 19.

Anthropology at UCR

This Forum is Sponsored by the Anthropology Department and the Anthropology Club and free admission for Riverside County students is made possible with the generous Co-Sponsorship of Service Plus Credit Union

Schedule

8:15 am
Registration and coffee

9:00
Welcome: Norm Rosen and Mary Baker

9:30
Focusing on lab and field research
Wendy Saltzman (UCR) and Leslie Digby (Duke University)
There and back again: Two researchers' tales of marmoset reproductive strategies in the field and the lab

Part I - Sex, murder and cooperation (?) in wild marmosets - evolutionary perspectives
Part II - Female reproductive competition in captive marmosets - proximate mechanisms

11:30
Lunch and Poster Session (maps of local restaurants will be available)

1:00
They're so human ... focusing on zoos
Karen Kilmar San Diego Zoo
The role of zoos in education, conservation, and research

2:00
We're so primate ... focusing on our next of kin
Roger Fouts (Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute)
Implications of Darwinian continuity for primate research

3:00
Break and poster session

3:15
Roundtable: Focusing on primate research
Moderator: Mary Baker. Discussion of the limitations and benefits of research on primates in captivity and the wild as well as the welfare of captive primates. Written questions from the audience will be collected during the break.

4:15
Wrap-up and adjournment

Admission: Free to students in Riverside County (UCR, RCC)
$7 all other students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Parking: exit the 60 fwy at University Avenue. $5.00 day permits can be purchased in lots 2 and 24 and can be used in any lot. Park in lots 19, 24, 1 or 2.

SCPRF Organizing committee: Mary Baker, UC Riverside / Wendy Saltzman, UC Riverside / Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, CSUF / Craig Stanford, USC / Lauren Arenson, Pasadena City College


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April 23, 2005

The Great Ape Crisis

Pasadena City College, Vosloh Forum
23 April 2005

Campus Map {Vosloh is "UU" on map}

Schedule

8:15am
Sign in & coffee, refreshments

9:00
Welcome -- Norm Rosen & Lauren Arenson

9:20
Dr. David Wilkie (Assoc. director of WCS-Africa programs & Director BCTF) What's for dinner in Central & West Africa: Bushmeat, Poverty & Wildlife

10:25
Coffee & Tea break

10:40
Norm Rosen (CSUF/UCL/PASA) The Evolution of African Primate Sanctuaries: From welfare to conservation

Noon
Lunch break. Lunch on campus (see below) or fast food available nearby.

1:30
Richard Wrangham (Harvard University) Beyond Biodiversity: The case for World Heritage Species

2:35
Diane Doran-Sheehy (SUNY Stony Brook) Differing Conservation Threats and Potential Solutions for the Eastern & Western Lowland Gorilla

3:35
Roundtable discussion

4:05
Adjourn


Admission: Free to Pasadena City College students with ID; $7 all students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Please RSVP to Norm Rosen for headcount purposes.

Parking: On campus; $1 fee
Map to campus

Lunch: There is the option of chicken or vegan meal. Each is $12. Participants will pay the day of the event, but they must confirm their request for the meal (vegan or chicken) with Lauren Arenson by April 15 at ljarenson@pasadena.edu Otherwise, there is fast food across the street from the campus.

SCPRF Organizing committee: Mary Baker, UC Riverside / Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, CSUF / Craig Stanford, USC / Lauren Arenson, Pasadena City College / Elvio Angeloni, Pasadena City College


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November 12, 2005

Primatology beyond primates

Solis Hall 104, University of California, San Diego
12 November, 2005

Campus Map

Schedule

8:15
Registration & coffee

9:00
Welcome: Norm Rosen (SCPRF) & Jim Moore (UCSD)

9:25
Richard Connor (Biology Dept., U. Mass. Dartmouth):
Male alliances in bottlenose dolphins

10:25
Coffee & tea break

10:40
Fred Bercovitch(Conservation & Research for Endangered Species [CRES], SD Zoological Society):
Maternal investment in mammals

11:40
Pascal Gagneux (CRES):
In search of great ape research ethics

11:55
Announcements & lunch; poster session

2:00
Christine Johnson (Cognitive Science Dept., UCSD):
Social attention: A view to cognition in the wild

3:00
Steve Gaulin (Anthropology Dept., UC Santa Barbara):
Cognitive sex differences: The case of spatial ability

4:00
Wrap up, questions/discussion, and adjourn by 4:30


Admission: Free to UCSD students with ID; $7 all students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Please RSVP to Norm Rosen for headcount purposes.

Parking: On campus; free

Lunch: There is a food court at the Price Center on campus; Click for descriptions.


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April 15, 2006

Growing up: Development in primates

15 April 2006 at Cal. State University, Fullerton
SCPRF and The Human Nature Biocultural Anthropology Series at Calif State Univ. Fullerton

Mackey Auditorium at Ruby Gerontology Center
Parking & maps

Schedule

8:15am
Sign in & coffee, refreshments

9:00
Norm Rosen (SCPRF/Calif State Fullerton) Introduction

9:15
Dean Thomas P. Klammer (Calif State Fullerton) Welcome

9:30
Dr. Joe Manson (UCLA)
Father-daughter inbreeding avoidance reduces male reproductive skew in a wild primate population {Co-authhors: Laura Muniz, Susan Perry, Hannah Gilkenson, Julie Gros-Louis, Linda Vigilant}

10:30
Coffee break

10:45
Dr. Sara Johnson/Wendy Mills (Calif State Fullerton)
Fitness Consequences of social learning in reintroduced chimpanzees

12 Noon
Lunch; Norm Rosen will describe restaurants within 2 blockx

1:30
Dr. Raffaella Commitante (Cambridge Univ)
Orangutan Stress: Behavior & cortisol responses in rehabilitation

2:30
Dr. John Bock/Dr.Sara Johnson (Calif State Fullerton)
Trade-offs in time allocation and skill acquisition among juvenile chacma baboons.

3:30
Coffee break

3:45
Dr. Jane Lancaster (Univ. of New Mexico)
Synthesis/Panel discussion

Admission: Free to CSU Fullerton students with ID; $7 all students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Please RSVP to NormRosen@aol.com for headcount purposes.

SCPRF Organizing committee: Lauren Arenson, Pasadena City College / John Bock, CSU Fullerton / Sara Johnson, CSU Fullerton / Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, CSUF / Craig Stanford, USC /


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November 11, 2006

Social learning of apes and monkeys

Cal. State University Fullerton
Co-sponsored by the
Anthropology Dept., CSU Fullerton
and the
Institute of Gerontology, CSUF

Mackey Auditorium at Ruby Gerontology Center

Parking and maps

Schedule

8:30am
Sign in (with coffee)

9:00
Norm Rosen (SCPRF/Calif State Fullerton)
Introduction

9:30
Susan Perry (UCLA)
Social traditions in wild capuchins, Cebus capucinus

10:30
Coffee break

10:45
Tatyana Humle (Univ. of Wisconsin)
How driver ants are shedding new insights into culture in chimpanzees.

12 Noon
Lunch - Norm Rosen will describe options

1:30
Elizabeth V Lonsdorf (The Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes (Lincoln Park Zoo))
Social learning of tool-use and skills in chimpanzees and gorillas: integrating field and zoo research

2:30
Craig Stanford (USC)
The ecology of sympatric chimpanzees and gorillas

3:30
POSTER SESSION

Admission: Free to CSU Fullerton students with ID; $7 all students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Please RSVP to NormRosen@aol.com for headcount purposes.

SCPRF Organizing committee: John Bock, CSU Fullerton / Sara Johnson, CSU Fullerton / Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, CSUF/SCPRF / Craig Stanford, USC


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April 7, 2007

Looking at Lemurs of Madagascar

7 April 2007 at University of Southern California

Seeley G. Mudd (SGM) Hall 123

Parking and maps:

Enter campus by Gate 1 on Exposition Blvd, with parking in Parking Structure A nearby, or across Exposition Blvd in Natural History Museum parking lot ($7 both places)

Schedule

8:30am
Sign in (with coffee)

9:00
Norm Rosen-SCPRF /Craig Stanford-USC
Introduction

9:30
Leanne Nash (Arizona State Univ)
Social variability among nocturnal prosimians

10:30
Coffee break

10:45
Michelle Sauther (Univ. of Colorado/Boulder)
Lemur fragmentation biology: The effects of habitat variation, health, disease ecology & behavior in a population of wild Ring tailed lemurs

11:45
Craig Stanford (USC)
Food availability at USC

1:15
Ny Yamashita(USC)
Food properties & morphology in sympatric lemur species in Madagascar

2:15
Patricia C Wright (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Considering climate change in lemur conservation

3:15
Break

3:30
Craig Stanford
Roundtable discussion on status of lemurs

Admission: Free to USC students with ID; $7 all students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Please RSVP to NormRosen@aol.com for headcount purposes.

SCPRF Organizing committee: John Bock, CSU Fullerton / Sara Johnson, CSU Fullerton / Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, CSUF/SCPRF / Craig Stanford, USC


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November 10, 2007

Asian Primates in Perspective

10 November 2007 at San Diego State University

Arts & Letters-Building 201

Maps and parking:
Park ONLY in Parking Structure #4, levels 1 & 2 (free, if on these levels)

Schedule

8:30am
Sign in (with coffee)

9:00
Norm Rosen-SCPRF/CSUF
Introduction

9:15
Roberto Delgado (USC)
Assessing primate diversity in East Kalimantan & implications for conservation

10:15
Coffee & tea break

10:30
Chia Tan (San Diego Zoo CRES)
Rhinopithecus: The forgotten colobines

11:30
Erin Riley (SDSU)
Lunch & directions

1:15
Erin Riley(SDSU)
Conservation status of the Sulawesi macaques

2:15
Erin Vogel (UCSC)
Factors affecting foraging decisions in wild populations of sympatric orangutans & white bearded gibbons in Central Kalimantan

3:15
Break

3:30
Andy Marshall (UCD)
Effects of habitat quality on Bornean primate populations: Implications for conservation

Admission: Free to SDSU students with ID; $7 all students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Please RSVP to NormRosen@aol.com for headcount purposes.

SCPRF Advisory committee: Norm Rosen, SCPRF / Jim Moore, UCSD / Erin Riley, SDSU / John Bock, CSUF / Sara Johnson, CSUF / Lynn Miller, Mira Costa College


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"Which is our inner ape" - Bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas revisited

19 April 2008 at Cal. State University Fullerton
Sponsored by the Anthropology Dept. and Primatology Student Association, CSUF

Mackey Auditorium at the Ruby Gerontology Center

Maps and parking
Park in Lot E or Lot E West, next to the Ruby Gerontology Center

Schedule

8:30am
Sign in (with coffee)

9:00
Jack Bedell (Chair, Dept. of Anthropology)
Welcome

9:15
Norm Rosen (SCPRF/CSUF/UCL)
Introductions

9:30
Volker Sommer (UCL)
"You are what you eat" Feeding ecology of chimpanzees & bonobos

10:30
Coffee & tea break

10:45
Amy Parish (USC)
"The other closest relative" Bonobos and their female centered society

11:45
Norm Rosen (CSUF)
Lunch & directions

1:15
Sandy Harcourt(UCD)
Is socioecology useful for conservation of gorillas?

2:15
Brian Hare (Duke University)
Does bonobo and chimpanzee psychology differ radically?

3:15
Break

3:30
Pascal Gagneux (UCSD)
The genetic differences between chimpanzees and humans

Admission: Free to CSUF students with ID; $7 all students (with ID); $12 general. Pay at the door.

Please RSVP to NormRosen@aol.com for headcount purposes.

SCPRF Advisory committee: John Bock, CSUF / Sara Johnson, CSUF / Lynn Miller, Mira Costa College / Jim Moore, UCSD / Norm Rosen, SCPRF/CSUF/UCL / Craig Stanford, USC


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Primate Conservation

8 November 2008
Los Angeles Zoo

8:30 am
Check-in, coffee & bagels

9 - 9:15
Norm Rosen (SCPRF/UCL) & Cathleen Cox (LA Zoo): Welcome & introduction

9:30
Kaberi Kar-Gupta (CSU Fresno)
A tale of a nocturnal primate in a human modified landscape of southern India [abstract at bottom of page]

10:30
Break

10:45
Lynne Miller (MiraCosta Community College)
Conservation and experimental ecology in capuchins

11:45
Lunch break

1:00
Raffaella Commitante (CSU Fullerton)
To rehabilitate or not to rehabilitate orangutans

2:00
Serge Wich (Great Ape Trust)
How many orangutans remain in the wild?

3:00
Peter Fashing (CSU Fullerton)
Long term field studies & conservation in Africa

4:00
Close

SCPRF Advisory Committee: Jim Moore (UCSD), John Bock (CSUF), Sara Johnson (CSUF), Lynne Miller (Mira Costa Community College)


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New Discoveries in Primate Behavior

25 April 2009
CSU San Bernardino, UH 106

Parking: Lot D [ONLY!]
MAP
8:30 am
Check-in, coffee & bagels

9 - 9:15
Norm Rosen (SCPRF/CSUF) & Peter Robertshaw (CSUSB): Welcome & introduction

9:15
Nga Nguyen (Cal State Fullerton & Cleveland Metroparks Zoo)
The behavioral endocrinology of motherhood in wild baboons of Amboseli

10:15
Break

10:30
Ulrich Reichard (University of Southern Illinois)
Revisiting gibbon monogamy

11:30
Lunch details: Peter Robertshaw

1:30
Jim Moore (UCSD; presenting) & Adriana Hernandez-Aguilar (Cambridge University)
Chimpanzees in a dry, open, and seasonal habitat: Ugalla, Tanzania

2:30
Jill Pruetz (Iowa State)
Tool use of Senegal chimpanzees [Dr. Pruetz missed her flight, was unable to come]

3:30
Break

3:45
Roundtable discussion (moderated by Lynne Miller, Mira Costa College)

4:15
Close

SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCPRF), Jim Moore (UCSD), John Bock (CSUF), Sara Johnson (CSUF), Lynne Miller (Mira Costa Community College)

Registration: Students with ID - $7.00; all others $12.00


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New Directions in Studies of New World Monkeys

7 November 2009
Cal State Northridge, University Student Union (USU), Northridge Room

Directions and Parking
http://www.csun.edu/maps/
On-campus parking is $6; street parking next to campus is free.
8:30
Check in, coffee, bagels

9:00
Opening remarks

9:15
Christina Campbell (CSU Northridge). Spider monkey reproductive physiology and behavior: Current knowledge and future directions. - Dr. Campbell came down with H1N1 the night before, could not give her talk, and was replaced by

Becky Raboy (Smithsonian Institution). Using population surveys, GIS, and demographic modeling to identify key forest patches for golden-headed lion tamarins in a spatially and temporally dynamic landscape.

10:15
Break

10:30
Tony DiFiore (NYU). Behavioral ecology and social structure of spider monkeys: Insights from long term observational and genetic studies.

11:30
Lunch & Poster Session

1:00
Susan Perry & Irene Godoy (UCLA). Kinship and social relationships in Cebus capucinus: Insights from two decades of research at Lomas Barbudal.

2:00
Break

2:15
Jessica Lynch (UCLA). Capuchin evolution

3:15
Nancy Caine (CSU San Marcos). Behavioral consequences of individual differences in color vision in New World monkeys

4:15
Close

ADMISSION: Free to CSUN students with ID; other students $7 (with ID); $12 general admission. Pay at the door.

To make sure there's enough coffee & food, please RSVP to Nga Nguyen at amboseli@gmail.com, putting SCPRF RSVP in the email header.

PARKING on campus is in LOT G4 for $6/day. Free parking can be found on the street around periphery of the campus.
http://www.csun.edu/maps/

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Mate choice in humans and nonhuman primates

24 April 2010
Cal State Fullerton

Mackey Auditorium @ Ruby Gerontology Center
Campus Parking: Park in Lot E or Lot E West, next to the Ruby Gerontology Center

Directions and Parking
http://www.fullerton.edu/campusmap/

PROGRAM

8:30
Check in, coffee, bagels

9:00
Opening remarks

9:15
Greg Grether (UCLA)
Mate choice and the evolution of indicator traits: insights from research on guppies and other animal model systems

10:15
Break

10:30
Joe Manson (UCLA)
New directions in non-human primate mate choice research

11:30
Lunch

1:00
Martin Muller (University of New Mexico)
Male sexual coercion and female choice in wild chimpanzees

2:00
Break

2:15
Jim Roney (UCSB)
New directions in the study of human mate choice

3:15
Elizabeth Pillsworth (CSUF)
Mate choice among the Shuar of Ecuador: Stated versus revealed preferences

4:15
Close
SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCRPF/CSUF), Raffaela Commitante (CSUF), Peter Fashing (CSUF), Lynne Miller (Mira Costa College), Jim Moore (UCSD), Nga Nguyen (CSUF)
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Primate disease transmission & conservation

13 November 2010
San Diego State University

Little Theater, Room 161

Directions and Parking
https://sunspot.sdsu.edu/map/

PROGRAM

8:30
Sign in

9:00
Welcome (Erin Riley, Norm Rosen)

9:15
Peter Scull (Colgate University)
Modeling infectious Disease in Uganda Mountain Gorillas

10:15
Coffee Break

10:30
David Morgan (Lincoln Park Zoo/WCS)
Consequences of Sustainable Forestry and Conservation Efforts on Western Lowland Gorillas and Chimpanzees in northern Republic of Congo

11:30
Erin Riley - Lunch directions

1:00
Ronald R. Swaisgood (ICR/San Diego Zoo)
We are the science of saving species?

2:00
James H. Jones (Stanford University)
SIV Pathogenicity in Wild Chimpanzees

3:00
Break

3:15
Crickette Sanz (Washington University, St Louis)
Ape Health in Northern Congo: Continuing Concerns and Emerging Threats

4:15
Close
SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCPRF/CSUF), Raffaella Commitante(CSUF), Peter Fashing (CSUF), Lynne Miller(Mira Costa College), Jim Moore (UCSD), Nga Nguyen(CSUF), Erin Riley(SDSU)
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Tropical forest ecology: Implications for Primate Conservation

23 April 2011
Mackey Auditorium at Ruby Gerontology Center, CSU Fullerton


Directions and Parking
Campus Parking: Park in Lot E or Lot E West, next to the Ruby Gerontology Center
Map and parking information
http://www.fullerton.edu/campusmap/

PROGRAM

8:30
Check in (warm beverages and snacks provided)

9:00
Welcome (Norm Rosen and Steven Murray)

9:15
David Mbora (Whittier College)
The ecology of fragmented lives: how habitat fragmentation influences genetics and parasitism in the primates of the Tana River Forests, Kenya

10:15
Break

10:30
Andy Marshall (UC Davis)
Ecological and historical perspectives on the conservation of Bornean orangutan populations

11:30
Lunch info and break

1:00
Mark Leighton (Harvard University)
Prospects for primate conservation through high conservation value forest (HCVF) assessments

2:00
Joanna E. Lambert (Univ. of Texas at San Antonio)
Using data on primate feeding ecology and seed dispersal in conservation tactics: a case study from Africa

3:00
Break

3:15
Forest ecology Round Table moderated by Peter Fashing (CSUF)

4:15
Close

Co-sponsored by SCPRF and CSUF Dept. of Anthropology, the Environmental Studies Program, the CSUF Center for Sustainability, and the CSUF Institute of Gerontology

SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCPRF/CSUF), Raffaella Commitante(CSUF), Peter Fashing (CSUF), Lynne Miller(Mira Costa College), Jim Moore (UCSD), Nga Nguyen(CSUF)


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Primate Tool Use

5 November 2011
MiraCosta College, Oceanside Campus

Concert Hall, Building 2400
1 Barnard Dr., Oceanside, CA 92056

Directions and Parking
Map and parking information
http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/pio/campuses.html

PROGRAM

8:30
Check in (hot beverages and snacks provided)

9:00
Welcome Norm Rosen and Lynne Miller

9:15
Rob O'Malley (USC)
The appearance and spread of ant fishing in the Kasakela chimpanzee community of Gombe

10:15
Break

10:30
Crickette Sanz (Washington Univ., St. Louis)
Chimpanzee tool use in the Congo Basin: Discoveries and insights

11:30
POSTER SESSION

12:00
Lunch (the 1st 200 people to arrive on site and register will be offered a free light lunch at the "ocean view" dining hall, courtesy of Mira Costa Office of Instruction)

1:15
Anne Russon (York University)
How tool use fits into rehabilitant orangutan problem solving

2:15
Break

2:30
Rob Shumaker (Indianapolis Zoo)
Surveying too use across the Order of Primates: Assumptions, conclusions and future directions

3:30
Break

3:45
Primate tool use round table moderated by Raffaella Commitante

4:30
Close. Norm Rosen

ADMISSION: All students (with valid ID) $7; $12 general admission. Pay at the door. The 1st 40 students from Mira Costa College, Palomar College, and Cal State San Marcos will receive free registration, courtesy of a grant from the North County Higher Education Alliance

Co-sponsored by SCPRF and Mira Costa College, Palomar College, and Cal State San Marcos

SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCRPF/CSUF), Raffaella Commitante (SCPRF/CSUF), Peter Fashing (CSUF), Lynne Miller (Mira Costa College), Jim Moore (UCSD), Nga Nguyen (CSUF)


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Primate Conservation in Today's World

Saturday, 28 April, 2012
California State University, Fullerton

800 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton, CA 92831
Mackey Auditorium at Ruby Gerontology Center

Campus map: http://parking.fullerton.edu/Maps/PrintableCampusMap.pdf

PROGRAM

8:30
Check in (hot beverages and snacks provided)

9:00
Welcome: Norm Rosen

9:15
Raffaella Commitante (CSUF)
Methodology for Conservation: The Collaboration and Implementation to Succeed

10:15
Break

10:30
Chia Tan (San Diego Zoo)
Advancing Primate Conservation in Asia: Research, Capacity-building and Education

11:30
Lunch Break Announcements

1:30
Richard Tenaza (Univ. of the Pacific) and Linda Burman-Hall (UC Santa Cruz)
Mentawai: Listening to the Rainforest - a Meditation on Endangered Primates and their Habitat

3:00
Break

3:15
Norm Rosen (President, Orangutan Conservancy; Founder, SCPRF)
Obstacles to Primate Conservation

3:45
Primate Conservation Round Table moderated by Peter Fashing

ADMISSION: All students (with valid ID) $7; $12 general admission. Pay at the door.

Co-sponsored by SCPRF and CSUF Departments of Biological Anthropology and Environmental Studies

SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCRPF, Founder), Raffaella Commitante (CSUF), John Bock (CSUF), Sara Johnson (CSUF), Peter Fashing (CSUF), Lynne Miller (Mira Costa College), Jim Moore (UCSD), Nga Nguyen (CSUF)


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Great Ape Fieldwork in the 21st Century

Saturday, 27 April, 2013
1 - 4 pm
University of Southern California
Zumberge Hall (ZHS) room 159 (see grid D6 of campus map)

Campus map: http://web-app.usc.edu/maps/

Schedule

1:00
Check in

1:30
Welcome. Norm Rosen (Founder, SCPRF)

1:45
Roberto Delgado (USC)
Orangutan Research & Conservation: Lessons Learned & Future Prospects

2:30
Michael Wilson (U Minnesota)
Challenges and Opportunities for Chimpanzee Field Studies in the 21st Century

3:15
Round table/ Meet and Greet the speakers



Parking:
There are parking structures near each entrance to the campus ($10/day), and 4-hour meters along adjoining streets ($0.25/hour). Available meter spaces can be hard to find.

Payment:: Free for USC students (with ID) / All other students (with valid I.D.) $7.00 / General tickets $12:00
Please RSVP (for general count) to Norm Rosen NormRosen@aol.com ; enter "SCPRF RSVP" in subject of email.

Co-sponsored by SCPRF, University of Southern California Dept. of Biological Anthropology, and CSU Fullerton Dept. of Biological Anthropology.

SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCRPF, Founder), Craig Stanford (USC), Raffaella Commitante (CSUF), John Bock (CSUF), Sara Johnson (CSUF), Peter Fashing (CSUF), Nga Nguyen (CSUF), Lynne Miller (Mira Costa College), Jim Moore (UCSD)


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The Current State of Sanctuaries/Reintroduction Centers for Great Apes

Saturday, 6 December, 2014
1 - 4 pm
California State University, Fullerton
Ruby Gerontology Center Room 13

Campus map: http://www.fullerton.edu/campusmap//

Parking on campus: Nearby to Ruby Gerontology

Schedule

1:00
Check In

1:30
Welcome. Norm Rosen (Founder, SCPRF)
Brief Overview of International Illegal Primate Trade

1:45
Debby Cox (Jane Goodall Institute)
Insight into African Primate Sanctuaries

2:25
Raffaella Commitante (CSU, Fullerton)
Overview of Indonesian Orangutan Rehabilitation/Release Centers

3:05
Erna Toback (Board of Trustees, Chimp Haven)
Overview of USA Chimpanzee Sanctuaries

3:45
Norm Rosen
Close and Update for 2015


Parking: Free in parking lot

Payment:: Free for CSUF students (with ID) / All other students (with valid I.D.) $7.00 / General tickets $12:00
Please RSVP (for general count) to Norm Rosen NormRosen@aol.com ; enter "SCPRF RSVP" in subject of email.

Sponsored by SCPRF and CSU Fullerton Evolutionary Anthropology Program.

SCPRF Advisory Committee: Norm Rosen (SCRPF, Founder), Craig Stanford (USC), Lynne Miller (Mira Costa College), Sara Johnson (CSUF), Raffaella Commitante (CSUF), Peter Fashing (CSUF), Jim Moore (UCSD)


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Following are abstracts etc. from the forums.

Abstracts, November 2001: Gibbons

Warren Brockelman (Center for Conservation Biology - Thailand)
Relation between social structure and ecology in gibbons
Explaining social structure in gibbons requires the theory of social evolution through natural and sexual selection combined with a sound understanding of ecological principles; neither will succeed alone. The main social characteristics of gibbons include small group size, territoriality, and monogamy in family groups. There is evidence that gibbon groups are frequently not nuclear families, but exceptions to reproductive monogamy are rare and unusual. There is, at present, no complete agreement over how any of these characteristics have been selected in gibbons. The evolution of monogamy is facilitated by small group foraging, even distribution of resources, repulsion between females, and male parental investments. There is controversy over the function of territorial behavior in male gibbons, and over the importance of various types of paternal investment. Some recent models of monogamy assume that it can evolve as a result of female territoriality and mate guarding by males (the Trivers-Wrangham model), or by males guarding against infanticide. These are not likely to be sufficient causes; observational data indicate that paternal investment in the form of territorial resource defense by males and certain forms of direct male care are important in gibbons. In order to further test theories of territoriality and monogamy in gibbons, more detailed data are needed concerning territoriality in males and females separately, their knowledge of food sources and foraging efficiency, relations with food plant species (such as seed dispersal), and the importance of food limitation. Research in Khao Yai Park, Thailand, indicates that gibbons are highly efficient foragers of fruits with relatively large seeds of which they are the main dispersers, and that they rely heavily on detailed knowledge of food sources within their relatively small, defended ranges. A forest dynamics plot has been established over the range of the main study group in Khao Yai, in which all trees and lianas have been mapped and identified.

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Christina Klein and Lori Sheeran (CSUF)
Differential Mortality in Captive White-handed Gibbons (Hylobates lar) and Siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus)
Differential mortality refers to differences in the mortality rates of males and females of a species. Polygynous species are often characterized by the existence of male secondary sexual characteristics, more intense and greater amounts of male-male mate competition, male emigration, and little or no paternal care. In these species, males often exhibit higher mortality rates than do females. Monogamous nonhuman primates typically lack male secondary sex traits and have reduced male-male mate conflict, bisexual emigration, and increased paternal care. Differential mortality is often reduced or absent in pairbonded species.

In a paper published in 1998, Allman and his colleagues explored differential mortality in terms of caregiving. They hypothesized that males will have a survival advantage in species in which males assume many caregiving responsibilities. Their sample of nine primate species included white-handed gibbons and siamangs. They found that in the former species, females (the primary caregiver) had a survival advantage over males. They noted that in siamangs, males had a slight (not significant) survival advantage over females, which they attributed to the direct paternal care provided by male siamangs.

We focused on these two pairbonded species to further explore Allman's hypotheses and conclusions. Our data were drawn from the North American Regional White-handed Gibbon Studbook and the European Siamang Studbook. For both species, we tested the null hypothesis that males and females have the same mortality rates. Because mortality differences may become apparent or more pronounced at particular life stages, we ran logistic regressions on four reproductive age groups spanning 8 to 20+ years. We also compared the overall mortality rates of siamangs and white-handed gibbons.

For both species, male and female mortality rates were the same for the two older reproductive age groups (16 years and 20 years), but male siamangs had an advantage over male white handed gibbons in the first two reproductive age groups (8 years and 11 years). In all four reproductive age groups, siamangs of both sexes showed a survivorship advantage over gibbons of both sexes. We cannot easily attribute the siamang's survival advantage to the male's expanded parental role, because we found no consistent difference between the two siamang sexes. Instead, the survival advantage observed for siamangs versus gibbons may be related to the siamang's larger body size and slower development.

Allman, J., Rosin, A., Kumar, R., Hasenstaub, A. 1998. Parenting and survival in anthropoid primates: Caretakers live longer. Proceedings National Academy of Sciences 95(12):6866-6888.

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Ardith A. Eudey (Asian Section, Primate Specialist Group, Species Survival Commission, IUCN - The World Conservation Union)
Recent Primate Specialist Group activity involving the taxonomy and conservation of gibbons
In anticipation of the first electronically produced IUCN Red List of Threatened Animals, which attempts to assess the degree of threat to all animal taxa on the subspecific level, the Primate Specialist Group (PSG) held a workshop in February 2000, entitled Primate Taxonomy for the New Millennium, to establish a working and dynamic assessment of the diversity and conservation status of Primates. Developments relevant to gibbons included the elevation of the four subgenera of the family Hylobatidae to genera: Bunopithecus, Hylobates, Nomascus and Symphalangus. Twenty-nine gibbon taxa were recognized and assessed using the 1994 Red List Categories and Criteria; more than half (15) of these taxa were assessed as being threatened. Nomascus nasutus has been confirmed only on the Chinese island of Hainan, where its population is less than 20 individuals, and the taxon appears to be the most critically endangered (CR) primate species worldwide. Significant PSG activities to promote the conservation of Asian primates include the compilation of the Conservation Action Plan for the Primates of Vietnam: 2001-2006, of which the final draft was completed in July 2001, and the Conservation Assessment and Management Plan (CAMP) Workshop for South Asian Primates, which will be held in India in March 2002 and will include the compilation of an action plan for the regionally endemic and endangered (EN) Bunopithecus hoolock hoolock.

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Agustin Fuentes (Central Washington University)
Real Swinging Apes? What gibbon pairbonds and grouping patterns can tell us about evolution and conservation
Over the last 20 years it has become increasingly clear that gibbons are not "monogamous" primates, although monogamy is a mating pattern that may characterize many individuals in a gibbon population. Gibbon groups are not necessarily nuclear family units nor is their composition uniformly invariable or stable over time. Gibbons can be characterized as living in bisexual groups consisting of 3-5 individuals, on average, with approximately 10% of these groups consisting of three or more adults. Adult gibbons do form pair bonds, but the intensity and character of those bonds vary across species, as does the role of duetting in the creation and maintenance of the pair bonds. In the broader perspective, these aspects of gibbon social structure can provide insight into unraveling basal hominoid grouping patterns, the evolution of small-grouped primates, and the distribution and quality of pair bonds across primate species. These issues of grouping and pair bonds are also relevant to conservation priorities such as genetic diversity in gibbon populations, the impact of the pet trade on gibbons, and housing and rearing strategies for gibbon conservation and rehabilitation projects.

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Abstracts, April 2001: Baboons

Shirley Strum: Prospects for translocation as a primate conservation and management tool: insights from the Pumphouse Gang.
The escalating biodiversity crisis calls for new conservation approaches. Primates are not immune from the current threats but the special characteristics of primates may limit the application of some techniques. Translocation (moving wild groups from where they are threatened to another place in their historical range where they might be safeguarded) is increasingly popular in the conservation of bird and ungulate species. Systematic translocation experiments with primates have been rare. In 1984 three troops of of wild baboons were translocated 200 km from the Rift Valley of Kenya to the Laikipia Plateau. These troops had been the subjects of long-term research at the time of translocation and have been closely monitored since then. Insights from the baboon translocation and evaluation of the fate of the translocated baboons provide a framework within which to consider whether translocation is a conservation alternative for primates. The assessment of primate translocation also has implications for whether captive primates can be successfully reintroduced into the wild.

References: Description of the baboon translocation can be found in Almost Human, S. C. Strum. A brief update can be found in "Moving the Pumphouse Gang, S. C. Strum, International Wildlife:28: 12-21. Not much has been written on translocation but to get a feel for the difficulties of "reintroduction" (moving animals from captivity back into the wild) you can consult: M.Stanley Price,1989, Animal Re-introductions: the Arabian Oryx in Oman and Jan DeBlieu, 1991, Meant to be Wild.

Fred Bercovitch: Evolution of Sexual Skin Swellings in Baboons.
One of the most fascinating aspects about female baboon reproductive strategies is that during the follicular phase of their cycle, the anogenital region balloons in size and displays a bubble-gum colored sexual skin swelling. While the endocrine basis regulating sexual skin swellings is well-documented, the evolutionary basis responsible for this secondary sexual trait is subject to debate. Close to a dozen explanations have been proposed as to why female baboons display such pronounced sexual advertisements. After a brief introduction to the mating behavior and reproductive tactics of savanna baboons, as well as an overview of the endocrine dynamics underlying sex skin swelling, a summary of the ideas will be presented.

Background readings:

  • Bercovitch, F. B. 1999. Sex skin, pp. 437-443 in Encyclopedia of Reproduction, Vol. 4, ed. by E. Knobil & J.D.Neill, Academic Press.
  • Nunn, C. L. 1999. The evolution of exaggerated sexual swellings in primates and the graded-signal hypothesis. Anim. Behav. 58:229-246.
  • Stallmann, R. R., & J. W. Froehlich 2000. Primate sexual swellings as coevolved signal systems. Primates 41: 1-16.
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Karen Strier (U. Wisconsin, Madison)
Muriquis at the Millennium: Sex, sex ratios, and survival strategies
In less than two decades, the muriqui population at the Biological Station of Caratinga (Minas Gerais, Brazil) has nearly tripled in size. The muriquis inhabiting this 860 hectare forest fragment now represent the third largest, and possibly most viable, population of the genus. The muriquis' success here can be attributed to the high survivorship of all age-sex classes, steady birth rates at predictable 3-year intervals, and female-biased infant sex ratios. Ongoing research involving noninvasive fecal steroid studies are providing insights into the proximate mechanisms underlying muriqui reproductive and life history patterns. At the same time, behavioral and ecological studies are providing clues into the ways in which male philopatry and female dispersal can facilitate population growth and minimize close inbreeding at high densities. The implications of these findings both for other muriqui populations living at low densities in large protected forests and for sympatric Atlantic forest primates with divergent life histories and social strategies are provocative. Back

Lynne Miller (MiraCosta College)
Eat or Be Eaten: Predator risk and foraging strategies in Venezuelan capuchin monkeys (Cebus olivaceus)
Observations of Venezuelan capuchins have revealed a striking pattern of food intake that is dependent upon group size and season: Females living in larger groups maintain consistent intake throughout the year (~1800 cc/day), while those in smaller groups eat significantly more in the wet season (~2800 cc/day) and less in the dry season (~1100 cc/day). Early analyses attributed this pattern to temporal fluctuations in food availability and the differential competitive ability of large and small groups: During the dry season, food is scarce and easily monopolized by larger groups; in the wet season, food is abundant and even smaller groups can find adequate feeding sites. Additional research has focused on another important variable: the impact of predation on foraging decisions. This study explores the general hypothesis that, when resources are located in "risky" areas, only larger groups exploit these foods, and thus membership in a large group may confer a significant feeding advantage.

This model was tested with data from an ongoing study of several groups of wedge-capped capuchins (Cebus olivaceus) at the Hato Pinero Biological Reserve in central Venezuela. At this site, wet-season resources are located "safely" in the trees, and thus large and small groups all have access. In the dry season, however, important resources are found primarily on the ground. Ad lib data on alarm calls show that monkeys perceived the ground to be a "risky" area. It was predicted that small groups would avoid ground foraging and thus forfeit access to terrestrial resources. Focal animal samples demonstrate that members of larger groups spent more time on the ground (12% vs. 4% of behavioral observations, x2=23.39, p<0.001) and found a greater proportion of food on the ground (17% vs. 8% of feeding observations, x2=23.39, p<0.001) than did those in smaller groups. These findings indicate that differential predation risk plays a significant role in the aforementioned pattern of food intake and may thereby influence individual reproductive success. Back

Sue Perry (UCLA)
Traditions in Wild White-Faced Capuchins
Traditions (i.e. persistent, socially learned behaviors, prototypically present in several members of a group) have been documented in several nonhuman animals. Important questions that remain unresolved for all but a few species include (a) how rapidly and how far traditions can spread, (b) how long they persist, (c) in what behavioral domains they are concentrated and (d) their adaptive significance. Data collected by several research teams on three populations of wild white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) in Costa Rican dry forest over a 14-year period are used to address these questions. Several social behaviors occurred frequently in some troops during some time periods, yet not at all in other troops and/or at other times. These included hand-sniffing, sucking of body parts, and various "games" including the finger-in-mouth and hair-passing games. Furthermore, frequencies of these behaviors waxed and waned dramatically within single troops over periods of several years, and routes of social transmission between particular monkeys could be identified. I speculate that these behaviors function as risky tests of valuable social bonds.
Changed from original J. Manson & S. Perry, "Sexual Strategies and Olfactory Communication in Wild White-faced Capuchins" 10/19/00
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Sue Boinski (U. Florida, Gainesville)
Effects of geographic variation in predation risk and food competition on the behavior of three species of squirrel monkeys
Background reading:
Boinski, S.; Cropp, S.J. 1999. Disparate data sets resolve squirrel monkey (Saimiri) taxonomy: implications for behavioral ecology and biomedical usage. International Journal of Primatology 20:237-256.
Boinski, S. 1999. The social organizations of the squirrel monkeys: implications for ecological models of social evolution. Evolutionary Anthropology 8:101-112 Back

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Southern California Primate Research Forum
Ethics Panel: Ethics in Field, Laboratory and Zoo Settings
Second Meeting -- 27 April 1995

Traversing the Ethical Divide. The study and protection of primates is engulfed in powerful forces -- national and multinational economics, cross-cultural conflicts, medical and scientific debates, struggles for power and influence among special interest groups. Primatologists must balance contradictory viewpoints along a fine line between combat and denial. That line, the ethical divide, can be traveled safely from issue to issue if we agree to three things:

1) we are all committed to optimize the well-being of all primates, as individuals and aggregates;
2) the struggle to synthesize diverse objectives into common goals is extremely difficult, and absolutely necessary; and
3) if we don't collaborate actively, neither primates nor primatologists will survive.

The forum discussion will provide an opportunity for us to walk the ethical divide together. Panel members will present brief descriptions of ethical dilemmas in the field, laboratory and zoo settings. The moderator will help us to discuss those dilemmas harmoniously. The key to success of this discussion is our acceptance of the fact that in ethics "everybody's right". In one hour we will consider five situations, elaborate their complexities, heighten awareness of our varied concerns. We won't solve anything. We will better know where we stand and how we can help one another traverse the divide.

PANEL MEMBERS (with Discussion Topics)

Barbara Durrant, San Diego Zoo Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species
So many demands, so few drills. A non- breeding drill named Loon, first housed alone for chronic medical treatment, is now providing semen for cryopreservation. Artificial insemination may be the only way to save captive drills. Should Loon sacrifice his social life for the sake of the species?
Driving forces inherent in the dilemma: the discord seems to separate into drill forces and human forces. Drills: Loon's individual quality of life -vs- drill colony enrichment -vs- drill species survival. Humans: Keeper's sexual/social values -vs- SD community education/entertainment -vs- CRES preservation goals

Lynne Fairbanks, UCLA Department of Psychiatry
Too much of a good thing. We know the members of our vervet community so well, we can't push ourselves to discard them as waste, or sell them like a commodity. But their numbers and our costs are escalating without natural predation. Should we let a leopard loose in the vervet colony?
Driving forces inherent in the dilemma: the conflicts are among a mix of human and vervet needs and wants. Individual vervets' survival need + colony's drive to thrive -vs- UCLA/USA financial pressures; scientists' need for "natural" conditions (predation) -vs- humanists' bond to vervet individuals/families.

Anthony Rose (moderator), Social Change Systems
Traversing the ethical divide. Primatologists come with far-flung experience, values, and needs. Like most primates, we seek kindred spirits, shun outsiders. This psychosocial dispersal leaves us vulnerable to extinction. Should we collaborate to conserve ourselves and our subjects, or accept fate?
Driving forces inherent in the dilemma: contrary human biases foster personal and social disputes. Human values/perceptions: scientific/objective -vs- naturalistic/interpretive -vs- humanistic/interactive. Human attitudes/actions: competitive/attack -vs- cooperative/support -vs- elitist/avoid -vs- utilitarian/coopt.

Craig Stanford, USC Department of Anthropology
So many needs, so little forest. Profiteers pay national and local leaders for rain forest resources. Conservationists join the auction -- buy up reserves, finance ecotourism, underwrite national forestry programs. Should local people and their economies be preserved or forfeited in the process?
Driving forces inherent in the dilemma: struggles are mostly between insider needs and diverse outsider wants. Rainforest/wildlife survival needs -vs- local people's survival needs -vs- outsiders' divided wants. Outsider priorities: conservation/culture/adventure/knowledge -vs- resources/control/power/profit

Richard Wrangham, Harvard University Department of Anthropology
Too much of a bad thing. The number of confiscated and displaced chimpanzees is booming in Africa. Captive facilities are few and poor, and they can't join wild populations. Should they be killed? Sterilized? Rehabilitated and sent to tourist parks, sanctuaries, forests with no wild chimps?
Driving forces inherent in the dilemma: here all the above forces are at play, and more! Individual chimps' needs for life/land -vs- local people's cultural survival -vs- outsiders' mixed priorities. Conservation naturalists -vs- rehabilitation humanists -vs- scientific purists -vs- ecotourism profiteers.
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Southern California Primate Research Forum
Roundtable Discussion: Making the Captive-Field Connection
Third meeting, 18 November 1995

Discussants: Karen Kilmar, Don Lindburg, Katherine Milton, Joan Silk, and Anthony Rose

We must optimize the transfer of knowledge and experience among primatologists who work in various captive and field settings --

  • To improve the well-being of both captive and wild NHPs.
  • To preserve wild habitat and enhance captive environments.
  • To advance the methods and discoveries of biological science.
  • To educate and inspire students, professionals, politicians, and the public.
  • To promote, plan, and implement NHP conservation programs.
This Panel Roundtable Discussion is dedicated to furthering that optimization. As usual, we expect to raise questions and consider options, successes and failures -- not to come to conclusions. The American Heritage dictionary defines a Forum as a public meeting or presentation involving a discussion, usually among experts and often including audience participation. Key words here are discussion and participation. We all bring expertise to this forum -- varied perspectives that will combine to enrich everyone's knowledge and awareness. In that spirit we are asking all Forum attendees to explore the San Diego Zoo during the 3 hours from 12 noon to 3pm -- seeking and discussing opportunities vital to making the captive-field connection.

Discussant Don Lindburg of CRES defines the challenge from the captive side: "I am interested in exploring how experience of the wild animal shapes perceptions about the same animal's well being in captivity. For zoos in particular, thinking about the requirements of space, travel, food, etc., from a knowledge standpoint may be quite different from first hand experience of the animal in the wild state. If we have experience only from the captive side, we may err in the direction of over simplification of habitats in failing to appreciate, for example, the importance of auditory or tactile stimulation. Or we may give highest priority to human needs in stressing esthetics, ease of access for experimentation, or caregiving requirements. On the other hand, those who have worked only in wild habitats are often overly critical of captive situations, and may have a limited understanding of what can actually be done to replicate the wild in a captive setting."

Discussant Katherine Milton of UC Berkeley points to a crucial aspect of the above challenge -- factors which effect field and captive NHP life-span. She asks if some primates (e.g., leaf-eating monkeys) "live longer in the wild than in captivity? If so, how can the situation for these short-lived captive primates be improved?" Professor Milton is also looking for ways that those who work with captive primates can contribute to field research and conservation. "What are the success stories in the reintroduction of captive bred primates into forests? How can we assure that field habitat will not be destroyed, that reintroduced animals will not be hunted and wiped out, that conservation foundations actually deliver the goods?"

These questions will be grist for the mill during our day at San Diego Zoo. In listening to the talks, please consider the implications of the research for making captive-field connections. During the breaks, and in the open period between 12 noon and 3pm, we hope you will discuss these kinds of issues with other forum attendees. To assure that our one-hour Panel Discussion deals with topics that we can influence most directly, we will focus first on the use of field experience to improve the well-being and longevity of captive primates. As time permits, we will talk about how captive experience can contribute to field research and conservation. While thinking about these interactions, we hope you will take some time to make notes on the opposite side of this handout and bring it to the Roundtable at 3pm.

Thanks for your participation. Please enjoy your Forum and your visit to the San Diego Zoo.

[Following is the opposite side of thr handout]

The Use of Field Experience and Information to Improve the Well- being and Longevity of Captive Primates

In order to enrich this discussion, we ask you to do a little work while exploring the zoo. Please use this sheet to jot down brief descriptions of captive situations that appear changeworthy, and make some notes indicating how you think field researchers might provide useful information and experience to guide improvement. We won't be able to discuss all the issues, of course, but your forethought will certainly advance the Forum.

The Use of Captive Experience and Information to Improve the Well- Being and Longevity of Wild Primates
Clearly the interchange goes in both directions -- field researchers and conservationists can make use of the experience and information of people who work in captive settings. During your time in the zoo, please also note any field situations you think might benefit by input from scientists and caretakers you meet and observe here at the San Diego Zoo.

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Southern California Primate Research Forum
Fourth Meeting, 27 April 1996

Group 1 -- Conservation Priorities (facilitators: Eudey and Gilpin)
What is the critical ratio of poached to living great apes in a habitat that is needed to drive the decision to re-direct significant conservation resources from ecological assessment towards anti- poaching activities?

Group 2 -- Technology and Science (facilitators: Moore and Ryder)
How can one improve the veracity of data on commercial sale of great ape bush meat so as to make it useful to hypothesis testing and policy making in conservation?

Group 3 -- Ethics and Welfare (facilitators: Rose and Stewart)
What are the practical factors in wildlife ethics and welfare that must be considered when deciding whether or not to save a young ape orphaned by the bush meat trade?

Group 4 -- Cultural Conflict (facilitators: Stanford and Strum)
How can the conflicting values and interests of local, national, and external cultures be accommodated to gain optimal satisfaction of the needs of all factions, while maintaining focus on protection and conservation of species, habitat, and biodiversity?
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Abstracts for forum #17:


(Scroll down for the one you want)

Carol Ward: Evolutionary context for hominin emergence
The Miocene witnessed a vast radiation of apes, out of which arose hominin ancestors. The process of natural selection that shaped the earliest hominins began in the Miocene. This diverse radiation of extinct apes, therefore, is the key to reconstructing the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans. By comparing patterns of derived similarities among Miocene apes, we can begin to trace the sequence of evolutionary changes that led to the earliest hominins. Recently, three new late Miocene genera have been announced that date to approximately the time of hominin divergence, and each has been labeled a hominin. Although incompletely known so far, each displays a different suite of shared similarities with later hominins, and adds more complexity to our picture of hominin origins. Still, only by incorporating all possible morphologic and phylogenetic evidence from living and fossil apes and humans can we hope to accurately understand the biology and behavior of the earliest hominins and the evolutionary pressures that shaped them.

Alan Walker: The first hominid dispersal from Africa
The first dispersal of hominids out of Africa took place about 1.8 million years ago. These are called early African Homo erectus or Homo ergaster, depending on taxomonic preference. Other hominids such as Australopithecus did not disperse from Africa into Eurasia despite the fact that they did not become extinct until about 1 million years ago. The major contributing factor in this first dispersal was a major change in diet. These hominids were much more carnivorous than any earlier ones or any living great ape.
There are sound ecological and energetic reasons why, relative to herbivores or omnivores, carnivores have reduced population sizes, enlarged species ranges, and a unique set of behavioral and life history patterns. I will explore these by examining what we know of early Homo life history and behavior.

Wesley A Niewoehner: Late Pleistocene human behavioral evolution: Evidence from the fossil record
Anatomically modern human cranio-facial and postcranial morphologies evolved in the Old World during the Late Pleistocene. Analyses of the cranio-facial region are usually the main focus of phylogenetic debates regarding whether, and to what extent, Neandertals contributed to the recent human gene pool. Sometimes lost in the emphasis on phylogeny are issues of human behavioral evolution. Some paleoanthropologists disregard phylogenetic issues in favor of quantifying correlated shifts in postcranial morphology within the framework of the hypothesis that archaic human behavior was not a technologically limited version of recent hunter-gatherer behavior. Central to this intellectual and methodological framework is the integration of Paleolithic archeology with functional analyses of the skeleton. Neandertals, the most numerous and best preserved sample of Late Pleistocene humans, are morphologically and functionally distinct from more recent humans in many developmentally plastic regions of the upper limb skeleton. We have gained valuable insight into human behavioral evolution by analyzing Late Pleistocene human upper limb skeletal functional complexes and correlated changes in Paleolithic tool technologies.

Ian Tattersall: Adaptation: An Evolutionary Red Herring?
Biological anthropology provides a conceptual umbrella for a bewildering variety of fields. Diverse as they are, though, these fields are united by the belief that various forms of biological and cultural adaptations somehow underwrite the differences -- and similarities -- manifest among hominid species and populations. Is this belief always justified? I argue that frequently it may not be. Our casual acceptance of the notions that 1) structure=adaptation, and 2) that evolution is a straightforward matter of fine-tuning in individual characteristics, has blinded us to the complexities of a process into which many more elements enter. Here I look at those other complexities, and conclude that notions of adaptive optimization lead to distorted expectations of evolutionary process and hence to inaccurate views of evolutionary histories, including that of Homo sapiens.

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